3 Easy Steps to Repair Low Water-flow in Faucets Yourself | DIY |How To

[:en]Hardness in the water leaves mineral deposits in faucet filters and aerators reducing the water flow. These scales or clogs increases with time blocking the water flow completely.”

Causes of reduced Pressure in Faucets

If you are living in a metro or if you are dependent on bore wells for your water needs, there is an elevated probability that the water flowing through your plumbing system is “Hard-water“. Hardness in water is caused due to dissolved minerals. Hardness can be classified as temporary hardness or permanent hardness depending on the type of dissolved minerals. Hardness in water is considered as a major cause of corrosion in pipe lines and plumbing fixtures.

Flow Pressure through tap Before & After Fixing

Flow Pressure through tap Before & After Fixing

Enough of theory, let me focus on one of the most common issue caused by hard-water, “Clogging in Taps or Faucets“. Most of the faucets available in the market have removable filters (see image below) at the tip. These filters are provided either to work as aerators (a mechanism to add air bubbles in low-flow faucets) or to filter out dirt and debris in water. Hardness in the water causes scale formations which sediment on the pipe walls. When water flows through the pipe, scales are carried along with the flowing water and deposited in these filters at the outlet of faucets.

Faucet with Water Filer at Tip

Faucet with Water Filter at Tip

This sedimentation leads to reduced discharge from taps which is very irritating. If the pressure of water flow from your faucet reduces over time and you have a faucet with filter mechanism you can confirm that water hardness is the villain. Follow these steps to fix it.

Step 1

First step is to identify the type of faucet that you have. Most of the taps with filter will have a notch or groove at the tip, as you see in the image above. If you can find it, it is definite that the aerator/filter is removable. You can remove the filter with your bare hands by turning it in anti-clockwise direction. If the fitting is too old, it might be too hard to open it with your bare hands. If that is the case, you can use a spanner (usually #20) to open it, holding against the notch. Be careful not to leave any scratch on the tap. Keeping cloth while opening is a good practice.

Removing Faucet or Tap Filter

Removing Faucet or Tap Filter

Step 2

Shocked seeing the amount of dirt? Removed filter might look like the one shown in the image below or worse. You can see thick scales and dirt deposited in the filter. Clean it thoroughly under running water. You can use your old toothbrush to scrub the hard deposits.

Salt or Mineral Deposits in Faucet Filter

Salt or Mineral Deposits in Faucet Filter

Step 3

After cleaning the deposits, your aerator should look like this. Now you can put this back in-place buy turning the filter clockwise direction. Tighten it just enough avoid water dripping from the sides of the filter. Feel the thread while you do this. Don’t hesitate to remove and put it back if you feel that the thread is not correct. You will have to repeat this process once in two months or maybe more frequently depending on the quality of supply water. I hope this post was useful and won’t call your plumber next time to fix this silly issue.

Fauced Filter after Cleaning

Faucet Filter after Cleaning

Check the flow now. I’m sure that the pressure has almost doubled now. Congo! you have done it. Do share, comment and like the post if this was useful.

3 Easy Steps to Repair Low Water Pressure in Taps Yourself | DIY |How To

High Pressure Flow through tap

High Pressure Flow through tap

 [:HI]Hardness in the water leaves mineral deposits in faucet filters and aerators reducing the water flow. These scales or clogs increases with time blocking the water flow completely.”

Causes of reduced Pressure in Faucets

Flow Pressure through tap Before & After Fixing

Flow Pressure through tap Before & After Fixing

If you are living in a metro or if you are dependent on bore wells for your water needs, there is an elevated probability that the water flowing through your plumbing system is “Hard-water“. Hardness in water is caused due to dissolved minerals. Hardness can be classified as temporary hardness or permanent hardness depending on the type of dissolved minerals. Hardness in water is considered as a major cause of corrosion in pipe lines and plumbing fixtures.

Enough of theory, let me focus on one of the most common issue caused by hard-water, “Clogging in Taps or Faucets“. Most of the faucets available in the market have removable filters (see image below) at the tip. These filters are provided either to work as aerators (a mechanism to add air bubbles in low-flow faucets) or to filter out dirt and debris in water. Hardness in the water causes scale formations which sediment on the pipe walls. When water flows through the pipe, scales are carried along with the flowing water and deposited in these filters at the outlet of faucets.

Faucet with Water Filer at Tip

Faucet with Water Filter at Tip

This sedimentation leads to reduced discharge from taps which is very irritating. If the pressure of water flow from your faucet reduces over time and you have a faucet with filter mechanism you can confirm that water hardness is the villain. Follow these steps to fix it.

Step 1

First step is to identify the type of faucet that you have. Most of the taps with filter will have a notch or groove at the tip, as you see in the image above. If you can find it, it is definite that the aerator/filter is removable. You can remove the filter with your bare hands by turning it in anti-clockwise direction. If the fitting is too old, it might be too hard to open it with your bare hands. If that is the case, you can use a spanner (usually #20) to open it, holding against the notch. Be careful not to leave any scratch on the tap. Keeping cloth while opening is a good practice.

Removing Faucet or Tap Filter

Removing Faucet or Tap Filter

Step 2

Shocked seeing the amount of dirt? Removed filter might look like the one shown in the image below or worse. You can see thick scales and dirt deposited in the filter. Clean it thoroughly under running water. You can use your old toothbrush to scrub the hard deposits.

Salt or Mineral Deposits in Faucet Filter

Salt or Mineral Deposits in Faucet Filter

Step 3

After cleaning the deposits, your aerator should look like this. Now you can put this back in-place buy turning the filter clockwise direction. Tighten it just enough avoid water dripping from the sides of the filter. Feel the thread while you do this. Don’t hesitate to remove and put it back if you feel that the thread is not correct. You will have to repeat this process once in two months or maybe more frequently depending on the quality of supply water. I hope this post was useful and won’t call your plumber next time to fix this silly issue.

Fauced Filter after Cleaning

Faucet Filter after Cleaning

Check the flow now. I’m sure that the pressure has almost doubled now. Congo! you have done it. Do share, comment and like the post if this was useful.

3 Easy Steps to Repair Low Water Pressure in Taps Yourself | DIY |How To

High Pressure Flow through tap

High Pressure Flow through tap

 [:de]Hardness in the water leaves mineral deposits in faucet filters and aerators reducing the water flow. These scales or clogs increases with time blocking the water flow completely.”

Causes of reduced Pressure in Faucets

Flow Pressure through tap Before & After Fixing

Flow Pressure through tap Before & After Fixing

If you are living in a metro or if you are dependent on bore wells for your water needs, there is an elevated probability that the water flowing through your plumbing system is “Hard-water“. Hardness in water is caused due to dissolved minerals. Hardness can be classified as temporary hardness or permanent hardness depending on the type of dissolved minerals. Hardness in water is considered as a major cause of corrosion in pipe lines and plumbing fixtures.

Enough of theory, let me focus on one of the most common issue caused by hard-water, “Clogging in Taps or Faucets“. Most of the faucets available in the market have removable filters (see image below) at the tip. These filters are provided either to work as aerators (a mechanism to add air bubbles in low-flow faucets) or to filter out dirt and debris in water. Hardness in the water causes scale formations which sediment on the pipe walls. When water flows through the pipe, scales are carried along with the flowing water and deposited in these filters at the outlet of faucets.

Faucet with Water Filer at Tip

Faucet with Water Filter at Tip

This sedimentation leads to reduced discharge from taps which is very irritating. If the pressure of water flow from your faucet reduces over time and you have a faucet with filter mechanism you can confirm that water hardness is the villain. Follow these steps to fix it.

Step 1

First step is to identify the type of faucet that you have. Most of the taps with filter will have a notch or groove at the tip, as you see in the image above. If you can find it, it is definite that the aerator/filter is removable. You can remove the filter with your bare hands by turning it in anti-clockwise direction. If the fitting is too old, it might be too hard to open it with your bare hands. If that is the case, you can use a spanner (usually #20) to open it, holding against the notch. Be careful not to leave any scratch on the tap. Keeping cloth while opening is a good practice.

Removing Faucet or Tap Filter

Removing Faucet or Tap Filter

Step 2

Shocked seeing the amount of dirt? Removed filter might look like the one shown in the image below or worse. You can see thick scales and dirt deposited in the filter. Clean it thoroughly under running water. You can use your old toothbrush to scrub the hard deposits.

Salt or Mineral Deposits in Faucet Filter

Salt or Mineral Deposits in Faucet Filter

Step 3

After cleaning the deposits, your aerator should look like this. Now you can put this back in-place buy turning the filter clockwise direction. Tighten it just enough avoid water dripping from the sides of the filter. Feel the thread while you do this. Don’t hesitate to remove and put it back if you feel that the thread is not correct. You will have to repeat this process once in two months or maybe more frequently depending on the quality of supply water. I hope this post was useful and won’t call your plumber next time to fix this silly issue.

Fauced Filter after Cleaning

Faucet Filter after Cleaning

Check the flow now. I’m sure that the pressure has almost doubled now. Congo! you have done it. Do share, comment and like the post if this was useful.

3 Easy Steps to Repair Low Water Pressure in Taps Yourself | DIY |How To

High Pressure Flow through tap

High Pressure Flow through tap

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